2012 Cuenca Perspectives Collage

2012 Cuenca Perspectives Collage
VIVA CUENCA

VIVA CUENCA!

My mission in publishing this blog is first to provide a living history of my settlement and life in Cuenca, and to provide myself and the reader with a journal account delineating my reasons for why I have chosen to settle in Cuenca. Second, the posts are my way of staying in contact with family and friends back in the states, and to provide them with an understanding of a country and culture that most North Americans have little knowledge and awareness. Third, the blog is open to one and all who wish to compare and contrast the experiences of expat bloggers living in Cuenca, so that you can determine whether or not from your perspective Cuenca is an appropriate move for you. Fourth, my blog provides another example of how expats view and interpret life in Cuenca. Ecuadorians and Cuencanos who may read this blog are especially invited to post comments that may enhance all expats understanding and appreciation of Cuneca and its people, or to correct any misinterpretations in my assumptions and perceptions of Cuencano culture. Finally, I hope I can convey the feeling of love and appreciation that grows within me each passing day for this heavenly city nestled in the Andes and its very special people.

Saturday, January 14, 2012

HOSTERIA DOS CHORRERAS--LOCATED JUST OUTSIDE THE CAJAS NATIONAL PARK

Back in November of 2011, Jose, the Computer Guy, Cortez encouraged me to visit the Hosteria Dos Chorreras with him.  Jose promised me that we would have a great trout dinner on our visit.  I would also get some feeling for the Cajas since at that time I had yet to visit or travel through the park.  The Hosteria Dos Chorreras is a magnificent complex of restaurant, inn, and cabins.  All of which are located near the entrance to the Cajas National Park.

In no way did Jose prepare me for what a magnificent and breath-taking restaurant we were about to experience.  There are many dining areas in the restaurant.  Some of which are intimate and cozy, each with its own enclosure and distinct fireplace.  I encourage you to meander about the restaurant, or you will not even begin to experience what it visually has to offer.  I could not believe its size, the prolonged walkway to the restrooms, which like a maze made its way through dining areas, and in directions that led to the lobby and receptionist desk for the inn, or down another pathway that led through the gift shop and then meandered through the other end of the gift shop back to some of the dining areas. The enclosures of dining rooms and the gift shop were all in keeping with the rustic feeling and appearance of traditional South American architecture and furnishings. Each dining area has its own distinct decor.  However, these enclosed dining areas were only one facet of the overall restaurant design, and not even the major facet.

I absolutely envy whoever the architect and/or landscape architect were who designed the Hosteria.  What phenomenal imaginations of creativity that integrated the beautiful outside of the Cajas with the inside of the restaurant, and that they were blessed with the opportunity to design and create something so beautiful and distinct.  

The opening photos of the slide presentation introduce you to the area just outside the restaurant which display the pond teaming with trout. There were times while inside the restaurant, Jose and I found ourselves suddenly walking along a path of nature that lied just outside the restaurant, and other times we were following paths of greenery and vegetation that instead of taking us outside, led us to another unanticipated dining area.  The architects as you can see in the photos, play with our perception as we pursue a particular pathway, initially uncertain as to whether we are inside or outside of the building.  Sometimes part of the restaurant in places is built literally incorporating the exterior of nature into the actual restaurant. 

These major areas of large and varied dining areas are opened to the absolute beauty of the cajas and the vegetations just outside the restaurant by the expanse of windows along both the walls and ceilings.  There are times when one may feel they are sitting or walking through a greenhouse,  The designers did not stop there in their integration of nature both inside and outside of the Hosteria.  They also recreated large amounts of rocks, major plants, water falls, and fountains within the restaurant.  It truly is as if in these areas of the restaurant nature becomes one both on the inside and the outside of the Hosteria.  

There is also a dining area in a rather high loft above, which overlooks the dining areas below.  As you make your way through the presentation be sure to notice the rain barrel used as the wine holder, and some of the other items like books and an old fashion type writer that become set pieces which add to the ambiance of the restaurant.

The restaurant is truly a show-case.  The menu is extensive, although trout is their specialty.  The dining experience itself is more pricey, than seafood dinners I've had in Cuenca, but the price should be expected when one considers the sumptuous surroundings for a unique dining experience.  While the main entree was quite good, Jose and I did talk to the manager about the need to improve the quality of the side dishes, as well as their skimpiness.  If the kitchen can improve its overall quality, Hosteria Dos Chorreras, in my opinion would be a four star restaurant.

Jose and I did not see what the inn rooms looked like.  However, we did peer into the windows of the cabins, which are extremely nice.  The cabins are pricey by Ecuadorian standards for an evening.  However, the $100 plus price for one night by American standards are about $200 dollars less a night for comparable cabins I have seen in Indiana parks back home.

The Hosteria Dos Chorreras is ideal for conventions, seminars, romantic interludes, or just an upscale place to spend an evening while exploring the Cajas by day.  Otherwise, simply do what Jose and I did, explore the restaurant and its surroundings, have an enjoyable meal, and head back to Cuenca in thirty minutes.


Just click on the link below.  Then click on slide show in the upper left hand corner.  Finally, under the photo, repeatedly click on the plus sign to set the time from 3 to 7 seconds. 






2 comments:

  1. I warned you. I spent most of my adult life, no choice--early-riser. I dragged my butt through a mostly half-awake existence, only to begin to come to life around 7 or 8 in the evening. To groove with my biological clock is the absolutely most single beautiful thing about my retirement. Not to mention ten hour sleeps. Yea, life is good!

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